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Tuesday, August 4, 2020 | History

2 edition of Nitrogen and dry matter relationships for winter wheats produced in western Oregon found in the catalog.

Nitrogen and dry matter relationships for winter wheats produced in western Oregon

Kerry A. Locke

Nitrogen and dry matter relationships for winter wheats produced in western Oregon

by Kerry A. Locke

  • 333 Want to read
  • 33 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Winter wheat -- Fertilizers.,
  • Nitrogen fertilizers -- Oregon.,
  • Plants, Effect of nitrogen on -- Oregon.,
  • Soils -- Oregon -- Nitrogen content.

  • Edition Notes

    Statementby Kerry A. Locke.
    The Physical Object
    Pagination104 leaves, bound :
    Number of Pages104
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL15188367M

    Cox MC, Qualset CO, Rains DW () Genetic variation for nitrogen assimilation and translocation in wheat. 1. Dry-matter and nitrogen accumulation. Crop Science Vnuk L, Lozek O () The effect of nitrogen nutrition on winter-wheat yield. Rostlinna vyroba – When summer vegetable harvest is over before early October, there is usually time to get a cover crop well established in the fall. If you have a lot of nitrogen left over in your soil (i.e. more than ppm nitrate-nitrogen in 12” deep fall soil sample), it is helpful to plant a cover crop that will put on ” of shoot growth before heavy fall rains begin.

    Nitrogen and S fertility studies were conducted during the , , and crop years at four sites. Lind, Pendleton, and Moscow/Pullman are located in the inland region east of the Cascade Mountains and Corvallis is located in the Willamette Valley of western Oregon (Fig. 1). Environmental conditions vary widely among the four locations. In western Oregon, a yield response equivalent to 70 lb. N/A for sweet corn has been observed. Plenty of soil-building organic matter. Woollypod typically produces more dry matter than any other vetch. LANA shows better early growth than other vetches, even during cool late fall and winter .

    (). Nitrogen Application in Winter Wheat Grown in Mediterranean Conditions: Effects on Nitrogen Uptake, Utilization Efficiency, and Soil Nitrogen Deficit. Journal of . Cover crop dry matter and nitrogen accumulation in western Oregon. OSU Extension Publ. EM October ; Dick, R.P. (Science Panel Contributor - Soil Science). Oregon State of the Environment Report. Science Panel, Oregon State of the Environment Report. Oregon Progress Board, Governor's Office, Salem OR.


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Nitrogen and dry matter relationships for winter wheats produced in western Oregon by Kerry A. Locke Download PDF EPUB FB2

Fall-spring nitrogen combinations for wheat grain production. Fertilization nutrient composition, and yield relationships in spring wheat. Fertilizer experiments with winter wheat in western Oregon.

Field testing of several nitrogen availability indexes. Functions and transformations of nitrogen in higher. Nitrogen and dry matter relationships for winter wheats produced in western Oregon Public Deposited. Nitrogen fertilizers -- Oregon; Winter wheat -- Fertilizers; Plants, Effect of nitrogen on -- Oregon; Made available in DSpace on TZ (GMT).

of bitstreams: 1 LockeKerryApdf: bytes, checksum Author: Kerry A. Locke. Nitrogen and Dry Matter Relationships for Winter Wheats Produced in Western Oregon by Kerry A.

Locke A THESIS submitted to Oregon State University in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Doctor of Philosophy Completed March 8, Commencement June Norstar winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was examined in 11 trials with the objective of determining the pattern of dry matter and nitrogen (N) accumulation in dryland stubbled-in winter wheat.

Nitrogen and dry matter relationships for winter wheats produced in western Oregon. Nitrogen and Yield Potential. In ().

Nitrogen assimilation in common wheats differing in potential nitrate reductase activity and tissue nitrate concentrations. grazing. Adding nitrogen (N) at the time of treatment has been shown to increase dry matter production. Experiments on winter wheat cultivars ‘Brennan’ and ‘Revenue’ were conducted over three seasons ( – ) in northern Tasmania.

Crops were treated with varying rates and combinations of GA and nitrogen (N). Winter wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) was grown for 4 years in multi-factorial field trials at Rothamsted, southern England. Thirty nine elite commercial cultivars (primarily short-straw) were grown. March is the optimum timing for spring nitrogen fertilization of winter wheat.

Split timing may provide additional yield benefit, especially with soil types and weather conditions that favor N loss. The maximum nitrogen rate for high-yield wheat is pounds total N per acre, with economic optimum dependent on market prices of wheat and.

Total N (% in dry matter) PAN (lb/ton) Total N (% in dry matter) 1 2 3 4 4-week PAN (lb/ton) week PAN (lb/ton) -3 2 10 19 25 32 40 4 14 20 28 36 Figure 5 shows the typical relationship between cover crop N concentration and expected PAN release.

Table 2 (page 5) has the same information in a table format. Example. for S fertilization. For hard red wheat production, a common practice is to apply 1 lb S for each 5 lb N applied, up to 25 lb S/acre. Chloride (Cl) and micronutrients Responses to Cl have been obtained with dryland winter wheat, particularly in annual cropping areas.

Chloride reduces the incidence of leaf spot and the severity of certain. According to Ken Gross, winter wheat agronomist with Ducks Unlimited, applying spring nitrogen early, right at green up, ensures the greatest benefit in terms of yield and financial returns.

The influence of crop density on the remobilization of dry matter and nitrogen from vegetative plant parts to the developing grain, was investigated in the durum wheat (Triticum durum Desf.) varieties Creso, Simeto and Svevo cultivated in the field at three seeding rates,and seeds m −y × seeding rate interaction was unsignificant for all recorded characters.

Table 1.—Examples of crop biomass accumulation and crop nitrogen uptake measured at harvest. a Maximum Yield cumulative Maximum N Example level biomass accumulation figure Crop Locationb (unit/a) (dry ton/a) (lb/a) 2 Winter wheat (soft white) WV bu 10 3 Tall fescue and perennial ryegrass for seed WV 1, lb 5 4 Hops WV 7 bales 2 than the wheat grain crop.

Nitrogen is usually the most limiting nutrient associated with wheat forage production. Wheat forage containing 25 percent crude pro-tein will have 80 pounds of nitrogen in each ton of dry matter. A general recommendation is to increase nitro-gen rates by 30 to 50 pounds per acre for wheat as forage.

Introduction. As the largest wheat producer and consumer in the world, China produced around million t wheat with a planting area of about million ha in To meet the projected demands of population growth and increasing consumption, cereal production must increase by 70–% until .However, as one of major cereal, yield growth of wheat in China has dropped from 9% in.

Soft white winter wheat is grown in western Oregon and requires a spring application of nitrogen (N) fertilizer for optimum production. Determining the amount of N to apply has been a challenge for growers.

Wheat obtains N. It will also spread out fieldwork. Best of all, winter wheat frequently out-yields spring wheat. Seven tips for successful winter wheat production from Joel Ransom, North Dakota State University Extension agronomist, and Ruth Beck, South Dakota State University Extension agronomist, are: 1.

When possible plant winter wheat into standing stubble. Nitrogen deficiency can occur on most WA soils but is most common in the following situations.

In cold, wet conditions that slow nitrogen mineralisation and the uptake of nitrogen. Soils with very low organic matter. High rainfall on well-drained soils and soils with sandplain traffic pans can result in nitrogen.

As wheat is one of the major agricultural crops in Europe (Table 1), its fertilizer requirements have been investigated intensively during the last decades (Scharpf and Wehrmann, ; Hanus. Nitrogen Rate Recommendations for Wheat - Wheat has already reached green-up across the state so spring N may be applied anytime fields are fit.

Keep in mind that research has shown no yield reduction for N applications before Feekes GS 7 (two visible nodes). Dry matter accumulation at jointing-heading and post-heading ac- counted for about 40% of the total accumulated dry matter.

Nitrogen uptake followed a slow-fast-slow pattern, with accumulation about 40% from jointing to heading and about 20% after heading.

High yield mainly depended on dry matter and N accumulations after heading.Data for western Oregon indicates that lbs. total N/a is needed to optimize yield. When predictions on nitrogen need are made in the spring, we assume needed nitrogen can come from four sources - that already present in the vegetation, nitrate in the soil.

Nitrogen Nitrogen Timing. Winter wheat can be fertilized with the entire nitrogen amount in the fall, but studies in many winter wheat-growing areas show a consistently better yield response and greater nitrogen use efficiency when the bulk of N is applied in the spring at green-up.